All Posts Tagged With: "local"

Are You Looking for Unique, Repurposed Gift Items? Rebound Designs Has the Answer.

photo by: alyssa
Rebound Designs are purses handmade from the reuse of old hardcover books, most of which predate 1970. The selection I saw at a recent craft show included textbooks, D-I-Y Manuals, Little Women and Shakespeare, offering a variety of colors and designs for that popular vintage look. Have an old book you’d like turned into a bag? Creator, Caitlin Phillips is happy to take requests. Wonder what she does with the pages of each book? Well, most are beyond repair, but are sitting in her attic waiting for anyone else’s creative reuse idea…hint, hint. On occasion she finds someone to rebind them and they’re donated for further reading. She’s also happy to send you the pages with your purchase. I saw a great use for old book pages when I was at the Hamilton Tavern. The women’s bathroom has a famous female writer theme. Half the wall is covered in pages from old Jane Eyre novels. It’s quite beautiful and you’re still able to read the words. I never liked sitting down with a dusty moisture-wrinkled magazine or old newspaper while on the “john” anyway, te, he.

All Our Relations: Sacred Gardening

photo by: Getty Images

My good friend, Mare Cromwell , has been a professional gardener for many years. She also has a Masters in Natural Resources from the University of Michigan and has worked in the environmental field for 27 years both internationally and locally in the Baltimore-Washington region. She is offering a workshop on Sunday, October 12 (see our News & Events link to the calendar for more information.) This workshop comes out of her apprenticeship for the past twelve years with a Cherokee Medicine Woman. In these changing times, Mare tells me that Earth Mother is calling us to heal ourselves and our relationship to nature. Our gardens are where we can intimately rekindle a deeper relationship and reverence for the life around us to promote healing. This workshop gives people the opportunity to learn Native American practices and worldviews that will encourage deeper gardening practices honoring nature energies, garden health and planetary healing.

Mare’s gardening informs her other work, which is writing and occasionally speaking on ecophilosophy and eco-spirituality topics such as Environmental Hope, Living Simplicity, Deep Ecology and "Right Relationship". The workshop on October 12 will cover:
– How to bless your garden when you open it up in the spring and put it to bed in the fall;
– Claiming your relationship with the Creator and Earth Mother to honor your sacred place in the world and garden;
– Your garden as an altar;
– Intuitive gardening;
– Deepening your relationship and awareness of life around you;
– Nature as teacher and healer.

350: Global CO2 Target


There is so much anxiety in the air these days, along with all that excess CO2 . I was happy to stumble upon this global movement to solve the climate crisis. I’m sure I’m not alone in wondering — hey! When are our elected leaders going to wake up and DO something about this already?! Well, guess what? It’s up to each and every one of US to do something about it, whether that means changing out your lightbulbs, walking more, buying locally, and/or calling your elected officials to let them know your concerns. This website has wonderful graphics to explain the situation, making it perfectly clear even to those of us with science deficit disorder. There is also a way to take action, find events, and sign up to receive action alerts. Bill McKibben is one of the people behind this site, which is not surprising, given his interest in the subject. His book, The End of Nature , was an early influence on my career. Order it from your local bookstore — The Ivy or Breathe Books are two in Baltimore.

One Straw Farm

photo arranged by: alyssa
One Straw Farm is the largest organic vegetable farm in Maryland and has been in operation since 1985. Located in White Hall of I-83 and a pit stop away from Heathcote Community in Freeland. The farm supplies families, restaurants and wholesalers with a seasonal collection of certified organic produce. You can receive produce individually through a member fee or visit over 30 different markets, grocers and restaurants in the Baltimore area including Mill Valley Garden Center and the Waverly Farmers Market. The farm has 750 members all of which are within a 50 mile radius. Their website has a helpful harvest chart which lists when and what produce will be available. There’s a great article in Baltimore Eats, November 2008 Vol 3-#11, about how Drew and Joan Norman got One Straw started.


photo by: alyssa

Yes, their name is really Bark! And for good reason. No, they’re not a tree store. They offer premium natural and organic products for pets, like preservative-free pet foods and treats, natural supplements, eco-friendly toys and bedding, and handmade local items. They strive to provide products that are organic, hormone- and antibiotic-free, free-range/cage-free, made from recycled materials, sustainable and environmentally friendly, locally made, fair trade, and/or humanely raised. With locations in Clarksville and Olney, Maryland pet-owners have little reason not to visit.


courtesy of: BedibooPart of the Buy Local Baltimore guide, Bediboo offers clothing and accessory options for mommy and baby from 18 different brands selling products made mostly from soy fiber, recycled bottles, and chemical free plastics that also include handmade items. BumGenius! a one-size cloth diapers offers an industry first, stretch- to-fit tabs, cloth baby carriers, nursing tea, and much more.

Dogwood Deli

courtesy of: TGAW

See the CNN broadcast of Galen Sampson , owner and five-star chef of Dogwood Deli , located in Hamden and specializing in a gourmet-inspired organic menu using only locally grown fruits and vegetables. With a combination of a healthy and loving marriage to Bridget Sampson , great food and two dogs named Sox and Shoes comes this statement from Galen, "We believe sincerely in our mission of providing Baltimore with naturally-inspired food that’s fresh, healthy, and grown close to home. We use as much organic product as possible and find inspiration in the land, the sea and in nature’s changing palette. Our deli is named for the first tree we planted together after we were married, with a nod to our love of canines."